My Work


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Lessons in courage

http://www.bnltimes.com/features/86-all/570-lessons-in-courage.html

Beyond sex abuse

Raped after moving to Canada at 14, Leticia expected Western-world justice, but her Ghanaian mother dealt with the problem the traditional way

 

http://www.thestar.com/living/article/253466

 

Mixing and matching, to mom’s chagrin

Intermarriage is rising and it just may be the acid test for modern multiculturalism

http://www.thestar.com/article/231387

 

Journey into journalism

Malawian journalism students discuss human rights, constitution in their first JHR human rights workshop

http://www.jhr.ca/fieldnotes/view.php?aid=1298

 

Voices from the classroom 

Profiles on three young human rights journalists in Malawi

 

http://www.jhr.ca/fieldnotes/view.php?aid=1299

 

Daycare staff get low pay, no respect

A major international study last year ranked Canada at the bottom of a list of 14 industrialized nations when it comes to spending on early childhood education.

http://www.parentcentral.ca/parent/education/childcare/article/220120—daycare-staff-get-low-pay-no-respect\


More girls fighting with fists

Criminal charges against violent teen girls have more than doubled in 20 years as assaults earn respect and admiration within cliques

 

http://www.thestar.com/living/article/351039

 

Stories from our ‘hoods

12 young people reject `youth at risk’ labels to create and act in a dub/rap play about their lives, thanks to a challenging summer program

 

http://www.thestar.com/article/258297

Celebrating her own way

Young black woman couldn’t identify with drag queens and buff guys singing `YMCA’  


http://www.thestar.com/living/article/225571 


Girl power: three inspiring immigrant women

Three inspiring stories. Three inspiring women. For International Women’s Day Canadian Immigrant profiles three remarkable women to watch 

http://www.canadianimmigrant.ca/immigrantstories/moneybusiness/article/581

 

Young women in love with gangsters

`Ride or die chicks’ are prepared to do anything to show dedication to their gangster boyfriends

http://www.thestar.com/article/242150

 

 

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Interactive Media

Sojourner Truth- Aint I a woman?—Malawian students

A Youtube video capturing my gender workshops in Malawi with my female journalism students! 


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QbLq6d7PBJI

 

Photo Essay: A day with a media trainer

A photo essay capturing my jhr human rights/media workshops in Malawi !

http://www.flickr.com/photos/35571877@N07/sets/72157621885290290/

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Words from students

"Hi Simona, hope you are okay. You probably you don’t remember me. I am  Vanessa, I used to be your student in Malawi. I was the one whom you helped write that article in the Daily Times concerning the woman who lost her property. I just wanted to say hello and let you know that I have just finished my diploma and am about to do my research project. Thanks for being a great teacher. Hope you visit Malawi again.

- Vanessa Mdala,

"Hie! hie! Simona!

 

Seriously I miss you already. You’ve been a good friend to me and your name will still be on my heart and I do not see any reason why I should stop mentioning your name to my family members. I really like you as my teacher, friend and sister. I will never ever forget you. I will miss your beautiful smile and warm welcome that made me want to come to class. I will miss you a million times over and hope to see you one day again.

 

-Cindy Mchema 

Discovering success at MIJ

http://www.jhr.ca/blog/2010/07/discovering-success-at-mij/

Excerpt:

"Archibald Kasakura, a 30-year-old diploma student at MIJ, shares the impact Siad had on his journalism skills. “Before she came onto the scene, I didn’t know how to write features,”Kasakura recalls, “Simona made me what I am today.”

When Kasakura first started writing, he relied on Siad for about 70 percent of his work. “Initially, I thought she was being so hard on me, but now I know it was part of the growing process,” he says. But these days, Kasakura works independently at producing high-quality stories on a regular basis.

“I used to see human rights as something that doesn’t apply to Malawians, but now I see the importance of them,” he states. “[Simona] has opened my eyes.”’